FAQs

 

What is Fascia?

Fascia is very much like our skin beneath our skin, it is a densely woven covering that envelopes and interpenetrates every muscle, bone, nerve, artery and vein as well as all of our internal organs including the heart, lungs, brain and spinal cord. The most interesting aspect of the fascial system is that it is not just a system of separate coverings. It is actually one structure that exists from head to foot without interruption. In this way you can begin to see that each part of the entire body is connected to every other part by the fascia, like the yarn in a sweater.

 

What is a Myofascial Restriction?

Restrictions are areas of hardened or tight fascia compressing nerves, organs, and other tissue that lead to symptoms of pain and dysfunction. Restrictions can occur as a result of surgical scarring, trauma, poor posture, injury and stress. These restrictions do not show up on standard diagnostic tests such as Scan’s and MRI’s. The location and symptom of a restriction may feel tight, hot, hard or tender to the therapist or client. Or the client may feel a tingling sensation the comes and goes.

 

Why is Water Important?

  • Our bodies are made up of approximately 70% water
  • Fascia requires a fluid environment to move freely
  • Facilitates elimination of toxins released during treatment
  • Reduce soreness

Bear Rafting

 

My body seems to want to move or shake during my session. Is this normal?

During a treatment session, a client may feel a spontaneous need to move, stretch, shift, shake, twitch, giggle, cry, etc, all of which are normal. When your body has the urge to do “something” during a treatment session, you are encouraged to go into those feelings and allow your body to express itself. It’s the body’s natural way of processing and expressing what it needs to heal.

 
Elisabeth and George Dancing

Why am I sore the day after treatment?

When tissues are manipulated within the body, whether by direct treatment on an area or through a connection(s) elsewhere in the body, soreness may result. The soreness is often times referred to as therapeutic pain. It is not uncommon to have some stiffness or soreness for a day or two following a treatment session. Not all treatment sessions will result in therapeutic pain, but when it does occur, it is a normal part of the healing process.

 
Annika Rock Climbing

How often should I receive treatment?

As you start your treatment, a minimum of three visits are recommended to begin to open up fascial restrictions throughout the body.
For chronic issues, it is recommended that you receive treatment 2-3 times per week.

 

Why am I sore on parts of my body that did not receive treatment?

The fascial system connects all parts of the body. When one section of fascial tissue is manipulated, it can make you aware of other areas of tightness or tension . Mention these areas to your therapist at the next session.